What We Build 2017-05-05T09:35:05+00:00

What We Build

More than just four walls and a roof, Habitat for Humanity builds strong and resilient structures that make our home partners feel secure. Safe and decent homes uplift a family’s standard of living by giving them a true sense of ownership and pride.

Through the years, our organization has also expanded its services by providing water and sanitation facilities, schools, health centers, libraries, and multi-purpose buildings that can benefit the whole community.

Rebuild Bohol

Vargas Lane, Bgy. Culiat, Quezon City National Capital Region

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

The Rebuild Bohol project aims to assist families in areas affected by the 7.2-magnitude earthquake that rocked the province in October 2013. Habitat for Humanity Philippines is partnering with the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), local government units in the province, relief and recovery agencies, and corporate donors to rebuild 8,083 earthquake-resilient homes across 17 of the hardest-hit towns in Bohol.

Habitat Philippines has identified the following towns as priority areas: Buenavista, Inabanga, Clarin, Tubigon, Sagbayan, Carmen, Danao, Calape, Loon, Balilihan, Antequera, Catigbian, San Isidro, Corella, Cortes and Maribojoc.

 

Bistekville 4

Vargas Lane, Bgy. Culiat, Quezon City National Capital Region

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

Housing the largest number of informal settlers in the country, Quezon City* has more than 200,000 families** living in areas considered danger zones – 80% of which are informal settlers. Many of those families live in patched-up houses made of salvaged materials they find in dump sites.

Habitat’s Bistekville 4 site is intended to provide homes for those families currently living in the area as informal settlers, and other areas of the city including: under bridges, along waterways, on private or government land, and in doubled-up homes with other families.

* According to the Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council (2010)

**According to Quezon City, Urban Poor Affairs (2010)

 

Bistekville 1

Bgy. Payatas, Quezon City National Capital Region

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

Housing the largest number of informal settlers in the country, Quezon City has more than 200,000 families living in areas considered danger zones – 80% of which are informal settlers. Many of those families live in patched- up houses made of salvaged materials they find in dump sites.

Furthermore, only 35% of teachers in Quezon City have the luxury of having their own homes, with the remainder left to rent, squat or live in places far in distance from their work.

Habitat’s Bistekville 1 site is intended to provide homes for those teachers and their families, and families living along or in danger areas of the city, private or government land, and doubled- up homes with other families.

Bistekville 1 home partners pay a monthly amortiziation of P2,500, over a 25-30 year mortgage term through PAG-IBIG and Social Housing and Finance Corporation.

 

French Habitat Daanbantay...

Barangay Agujo Daanbantayan, Cebu

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

The “hypar” house design is intended to withstand up to 275kmh winds and Intensity VIII earthquakes.
The smooth-curved shape of the roof, and its concrete make-up deflects typhoon-speed winds; with the cement “bulb” footing reaching the depth of the hardest part of the earth, the houses also remain stiff against earthquakes.
Habitat’s Agujo relocation site is intended to provide safe, secure and sustainable homes for families whose houses were totally damaged by Typhoon Haiyan (local name: Yolanda), especially those who were living along the shoreline.

 

Locations Served