Blog 2017-05-05T09:39:34+00:00

Habitat Philippines Blog Page

Want to share and spread the news of Habitat for Humanity Philippines’ work or be up to date with the latest information and developments? Whether it be a new housing turnover or project underway, you can learn all about it here.

Tanza Relocation Site

Bgy. Tanza, Navotas City National Capital Region

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

The massive destruction of Super Typhoon Yolanda (international name: Haiyan) last November 2013 brought Habitat for Humanity Philippines and
various local government units, private corporations, organizations and indivuduals together to help rebuild the lives of families affected by the disaster.

Barangay Sulangan in the town of Bantayan in Bantayan Island, northern Cebu was identified by Habitat for Humanity as one of the relocation sites for survivors of Yolanda.

Rebuild Philippines: Yola...

Barangay Sulangan Municipality of Bantayan, Cebu

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

The massive destruction of Super Typhoon Yolanda (international name: Haiyan) last November 2013 brought Habitat for Humanity Philippines and
various local government units, private corporations, organizations and indivuduals together to help rebuild the lives of families affected by the disaster.

Barangay Sulangan in the town of Bantayan in Bantayan Island, northern Cebu was identified by Habitat for Humanity as one of the relocation sites for survivors of Yolanda.

Stonewell

Zone 1 and Zone 2 Pinamalayan, Oriental Mindoro

BACKGROUND:

The Philippines has a housing backlog of around 5 million. This number does not take into account families affected by both natural and man- made calamities which strike the Philippines every year. Therefore, millions of Filipinos lack access to permanent and decent housing and if there is no intervention to this national issue, the number of houses required is estimated to reach 6.5 million by 2030.

Some of these families have the means to acquire a simple, decent home. In Barangay San Pedro in Sto. Tomas, Batangas, families particularly comprised of public and factory employees fall into this category. However, there are not enough homes offered in the market that fits their financial capacity. Therefore, many families are forced to rent a place that they must share with other families.

Habitat for Humanity Philippines aims to break this generational cycle through developing communities such as Stonewell in Bgy. San Pedro, Batangas. Through this project, Habitat is partnering with all sectors to address these underserved families.

Pasig 2

Molave St., Sitio Nagpayong Bgy. Pinagbuhatan, Pasig CityNational

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

Thousands of informal settler families live in houses made of light materials along Metro Manila’s waterways, particularly the Pasig River. These make shift houses easily deteriorate and offer little or no protection, as areas on or near waterways are easily prone to flooding when rain and storms affect the city.

Habitat’s Pasig 2 site is intended to provide safe and secure homes that will provide sustainable protection for families living in these areas, or in other dangerous areas of the city.

Pasig 1

Bgy. Pinagbuhatan, Pasig City National Capital Region

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

Thousands of informal settler families live in houses made of light materials along Metro Manila’s waterways, particularly the Pasig River. These make shift houses easily deteriorate and offer little or no protection, as areas on or near waterways are easily prone to flooding when rain and storms affect the city.

Habitat’s Pasig 1 site is intended to provide safe and secure homes that will provide sustainable protection for families living in these areas, or in other dangerous areas of the city.

Karismaville

Bgy. Panghulo, Malabon City National Capital Region

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

In early 2000, the Philippine National Railway opted to renovate railways located in Malabon City. Thousands of families at the time lived beside those affected train tracks, in makeshift houses made of ply board as walls and corrugated iron as roofs.

Habitat’s Karismaville site is intended to provide decent homes for those affected by the railway renovation, by relocating them to an unaffected, safe area in Barangay Panghulo.

Rebuild Bohol

Vargas Lane, Bgy. Culiat, Quezon City National Capital Region

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

The Rebuild Bohol project aims to assist families in areas affected by the 7.2-magnitude earthquake that rocked the province in October 2013. Habitat for Humanity Philippines is partnering with the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), local government units in the province, relief and recovery agencies, and corporate donors to rebuild 8,083 earthquake-resilient homes across 17 of the hardest-hit towns in Bohol.

Habitat Philippines has identified the following towns as priority areas: Buenavista, Inabanga, Clarin, Tubigon, Sagbayan, Carmen, Danao, Calape, Loon, Balilihan, Antequera, Catigbian, San Isidro, Corella, Cortes and Maribojoc.

 

Bistekville 4

Vargas Lane, Bgy. Culiat, Quezon City National Capital Region

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

Housing the largest number of informal settlers in the country, Quezon City* has more than 200,000 families** living in areas considered danger zones – 80% of which are informal settlers. Many of those families live in patched-up houses made of salvaged materials they find in dump sites.

Habitat’s Bistekville 4 site is intended to provide homes for those families currently living in the area as informal settlers, and other areas of the city including: under bridges, along waterways, on private or government land, and in doubled-up homes with other families.

* According to the Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council (2010)

**According to Quezon City, Urban Poor Affairs (2010)

 

Bistekville 1

Bgy. Payatas, Quezon City National Capital Region

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

Housing the largest number of informal settlers in the country, Quezon City has more than 200,000 families living in areas considered danger zones – 80% of which are informal settlers. Many of those families live in patched- up houses made of salvaged materials they find in dump sites.

Furthermore, only 35% of teachers in Quezon City have the luxury of having their own homes, with the remainder left to rent, squat or live in places far in distance from their work.

Habitat’s Bistekville 1 site is intended to provide homes for those teachers and their families, and families living along or in danger areas of the city, private or government land, and doubled- up homes with other families.

Bistekville 1 home partners pay a monthly amortiziation of P2,500, over a 25-30 year mortgage term through PAG-IBIG and Social Housing and Finance Corporation.

 

French Habitat Daanbantay...

Barangay Agujo Daanbantayan, Cebu

RATIONALE AND BRIEF BACKGROUND:

The “hypar” house design is intended to withstand up to 275kmh winds and Intensity VIII earthquakes.
The smooth-curved shape of the roof, and its concrete make-up deflects typhoon-speed winds; with the cement “bulb” footing reaching the depth of the hardest part of the earth, the houses also remain stiff against earthquakes.
Habitat’s Agujo relocation site is intended to provide safe, secure and sustainable homes for families whose houses were totally damaged by Typhoon Haiyan (local name: Yolanda), especially those who were living along the shoreline.

 

Story: Motivated By a Dream

“I am willing to do whatever it takes.”

Shirley Elladora and Felisa Amistoso are both friends and neighbors. They live in Sitio Samar in the village of Agujo, Daanbantayan in northern Cebu. Their homes are near fish pens and a creek — it floods constantly, especially when it rains hard.

Both their homes were destroyed when Typhoon Haiyan ravaged northern Cebu in November 2013. After the storm, they salvaged wood, metal sheets and tarps to build small shacks on land that is owned by another person. They are in danger of being evicted.

But Shirley and Felisa aren’t easily discouraged. They are epitomes of the modern woman: driven, motivated, focused, goal-oriented, and put their families first. They have big dreams and high hopes, but they believe in working for it instead of simply being handed to them.

So when they saw the new houses Habitat was building in the relocation site in Agujo, they were immediately filled with hope. “It’s bigger and stronger than the house we’re living in,” Felisa says. “I really would want to live in one of those.”

The Habitat core homes are of a revolutionary design. Everything is made of reinforced concrete and steel, even the roof. The “Hypar House,” can withstand strong earthquakes and winds of up to 280kmh. The interiors are cool and spacious — 22 square meters — with a provision for a loft, which can double the floor area to up to 40 square meters.

The women were invited by the local government of Daanbantayan to participate in the World Habitat Day build last October 11. It was the first time they saw the houses, and also their first time to participate in construction as a volunteer. Felisa exclaims, “We’re happy that Habitat is here building for people like us. I’m personally willing to work just so I can get one of those houses.”

Shirley echoes the same sentiments: “You never know, right? God has a way of suprising you!”

Felisa says she has always dreamed of owning a nice house of her own. “I’ve been living [in Agujo] for 30 years. I’ve never experienced living in a big, concrete house.” Shirley, on the other hand, says they wouldn’t mind if they’re “poor, as long as we have a house of our own.”

Both their families, they say, are considered as squatters in the community. But they don’t care. “God is in control, he won’t let us down.”

Felisa says it will be a big help for her family if they are chosen to receive a new house. “If another Haiyan comes, we won’t be afraid anymore. We can live comfortably and safely. Our lives will definitely improve.”

Shirley echoes the same sentiments: “You never know, right? God has a way of suprising you!”

Shirley and Felisa have a dream: they want a new house and a better life for their families. The Habitat Hypar house is a symbol of that dream. And they are hoping, even working – towards it becoming a reality.

All In God’s Time

When life seemingly deals you a bad hand, it can be a long and gruelling experience. But sometimes, it only leads to better and brighter things. For a couple in Cebu, the long wait for a house of their own is over, and that life ahead is only starting to get better.

Analyn Bañal is a native of Daanbantayan, Cebu. She and her husband of 10 years, have gone through the worst of times, most especially when the province was left in shambles by Typhoon Yolanda (international name: Haiyan) two years ago. “The place we were renting didn’t give us the peace of mind that we needed, especially when there are strong rains. The frequent flooding would always force us to evacuate,” Analyn explains. “Often, we’re left with nothing but prayer.”

Two years have gone by, and their lives unexpectedly took a turn for the better: Analyn and her husband were chosen as one of the 76 recipients of a new disaster-resilient home in Daanbantayan, Cebu. The uniquely-designed “hypar” house is meant to withstand winds of up to 270kmh, a far cry from their rented shack. Situated in a plot of land farther away from the no-build zones, their new community is safer, more secure, and a better place to raise a family than where they used to live.

“The moment we found out, we jumped for joy as if there was no tomorrow,” she exclaims. “We no longer have to run for our lives now that we have our own home. The feeling was unexplainable.”

The couple believes that this is just the start. They hope more blessings will follow after their new home: Her husband would be able to bring in more income, Analyn would be able to find a good-paying job, and they wouldn’t have to worry about their health anymore.

And perhaps the best hope they’re holding onto — the best blessing they could ever receive after this — is something that they think will surely complete their lives and bring them endless joy.

“We’ve been trying to conceive for quite a while, but we’ve never been successful,” she says. “We’ve always dreamed of having a child to take care of and share our precious moments with.” Analyn says nothing else would make their happiness — and their new home — complete than to have a child of their own.

“In my mind, I could see my future child running and playing around the house, waving me goodbye before going to school. I could see myself even feeding him or her,” she says, holding back tears. Analyn believes that this may all be part of God’s plans, and maybe it’s in this new house that they’ll be able to start a family.

So great is her hope that Analyn already started making plans for their new season, and that includes setting up an additional source of income. “I also would like to put up a sari-sari store in the community to support the needs of our soon-to-be family. This would also take some of the burden off from my husband,” she says. “It’s also a way for me to mingle and bond with our neighbours.”

For Analyn and her husband, the thought of having a new house — and a new home — brings so much promise, and they are all the more looking forward to what life has to offer them. For them, this is just the beginning.